Wednesday, 11 March 2009

Racing Greyhounds

video

Don't mind me, I'm just experimenting with uploading my own video footage to Blogger. This means, I suppose, that I could video-blog ... except that I can't stand the sound of my own recorded voice.

It's fairly old footage: Forest the yellow dog is no longer alive these days. We were on holiday in the Lake District at a lovely farm that had a dog-exercising field. They're not chasing anything, by the way - they just love to run.

video

11 comments:

Jeremy Edwards said...

Have you ever heard your voice recorded well? It's easy to sound unnaturally terrible on crappy equipment—especially to your own critical ear—but a big, solid microphone and the warm hands of an audio geek on your knobs can bring back the real you.

Anonymous said...

I don't think anyone likes the sound of their own voice. Mine seems horribly high pitched and lacking in the gravitas that I hear in my *own* head when I speak.

Chris said...

Umm...that wasn't supposed to be anonymous. Not only lacking in gravitas but lacking in sufficient manual dexterity to operate a computer keyboard. :-(

Janine Ashbless said...

lol!

Jeremy, I know you've been brave enough to record a podcast interview. You make it sound like quite an enticing experience!

Chris - you got it dead on. In my head I hear a calm gravitas. Out there I hear a weird plumminess.

Jeremy Edwards said...

You might have even more technologically enhanced fun than I do, 'cause I'm just holding my own mic and twiddling my own knobs. (Yes, my recording equipment is auto-mated.)

Neve Black said...

Janine,
I'm quite sure you have a splendid voice. Sing, sing, sing, please.

Thank you for sharing. :-)

Janine Ashbless said...

You wouldn't say that if you'd heard me sing, Neve!

I'll stick to typing, for everyone's sake.

Jeremy Edwards said...

Re. gravitas: I think the head has a built-in natural reverb of sorts, and the richness of the voice resonates in one's own ears. Likewise, when listening to someone else in the real world, one gets the full spectrum of frequencies, the resonance of the room or the air, etc. Much of that is lost in the thinness and dryness of a recording, and the technology has to work hard to put it back. It's like stage actors wearing very artificial makeup so that, from a distance, their facial expressions will seem to have a natural definition.

Okay, I'll stop geeking out now. (Does that mean I'm geeking in?)

Erobintica said...

Jeremy - we love it when you geek out.

I too hate the sound of my own voice - and I'm not sure even the most experienced knob-handler could tweek it enough to make it sound good to me.

oh, and those are some fast puppies!

Madeline Moore said...

Aren't you just the hippest blogger, Janine? I inadvertently posted a video link to my myspace page not long ago but hastily deleted it before I took the time to think it might be useful...

My voice on radio sounded like I was a lazy Texan with a bit of a lithp.
EEEEEk.

Oh that's right I'm actually giving a reading in May so I'll have to get used to my lazy Texan voice saying stuff like 'Come all ovah mah feet you thecthy thtud...

Is that anxiety I feel, or have I just had a bit too much coffee today?

Janine Ashbless said...

Go Go Geeks!

And you're so brave Madeline. But at least a lazy lispy Texan accent sounds pretty sexy...